Andrea Bocelli Sings A Breathtaking Version Of ‘Silent Night’ Inside An Empty Cave

Andrea Bocelli sings A Magical Version Of ‘Silent Night’ In An Empty Cave

The vocals of this great man do not need much introduction…or reverb to sound amazing. However, this a capella version of “Silent Night” inside a cave will send shivers down the back of your spine!

The performance took place in the Frasassi Caves located in Italy. The Italian superstar tenor showcased his natural vocal ability utilising the natural acoustics offered by the walls of the caves, the results are something pretty special. This is sure to get you in the festive spirit!

Andrea Bocelli began his rise to fame when his demo tape was heard by the legendary Luciano Pavarotti. Since then he has released 9 complete operas, 15 solo albums and three greatest hits albums. These albums have sold more than 90 million copies worldwide. He has also received 20 music awards, has his own star on the Hollywood walk of fame and, in 1999, was named in People magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People.

Andrea met his second wife Veronica Berti in 2002 not long after his divorce from his first wife Enrica with whom he has two sons. Veronica was made CEO of Andrea’s currency management office a few years later and helped him found the Andrea Bocelli Foundation in 2011. The foundation’s mission is to “empower people and communities in situations of poverty, illiteracy, distress due to illness and social exclusion by promoting and supporting national and international projects that promote the overcoming of these barriers and the expression of their full potential.”

Veronica also gave birth to their first child, a daughter named Virginia, in 2012. Amazingly, in the midst of what must have been an incredibly hectic time in their lives, the couple found time to perform this beautiful duet. Andrea was recording the male part of Qualche Stupido which is an Italian song based on the enduring and beloved classic “Somethin Stupid”. The American version has been covered many times but the best-known version is the one performed by Frank and Nancy Sinatra in 1967.