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Amazing performance by The Beatles, Queen and Eric Clapton for the Queen’s Golden Jubilee

Buckingham Palace has been home to many a great performance. But one that shall be remembered for years to come is that of legendary artists, The Beatles, Queen and Eric Clapton.

As part of Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee on June 4th 2002, the audience fell silent to the orchestra, joined by Queen’s Brian May on guitar, as they delivered the patriotic notes of ‘God Save The Queen’.

Moments later, Sir (as of 2016) Rod Stewart sang those famous first words to ‘All You Need Is Love’ – a Beatles song first released in 1976, written by the late John Lennon in just two days.

With Sir James Paul McCartney (knighted in 1997) and the late Joe Cocker standing by his side, the trio took turns in leading the vocals, stirring up an electrifying atmosphere. Brian Wilson, who co-founded the Beach Boys, was also seen jamming at the front of stage, along with Roger Taylor on drums and Eric Clapton on guitar.

But the famous lineup didn’t stop there. Ozzy Osbourne (who has idolised Paul McCartney since a young child), Sir Cliff Richard, Sir Elton John and Sir Ray Davies (main songwriter and rhythm guitarist for the Kinks) were among the artists who filled the stage as the audience sang along, waving their Union Jacks to mark the occasion.

It’s safe to say these music Kings gave what is possibly the greatest gig in Britain since Live Aid. With over 200 million people watching it on TV, the performance warmed the hearts of people from around the world.

Fans have since jumped on Youtube, calling it a ‘stonking great jam session’ from the greats. And many paid tribute to the late John Lennon and George Harrison (The Beatles) as well as the legendary Freddie Mercury and John Deacon (Queen) who were sorely missed from the show.

This once in a lifetime collaboration made music history. It brought together some of the greatest voices of the 20th Century and honoured the uplifting song left to us by the singer, songwriter and incredible musician, John Lennon.